Fitness & Nutrition Concepts I've Changed My Mind About - Ivana Chapman

Fitness & Nutrition Concepts I’ve Changed My Mind About

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 When you evaluate new information you often end up changing your mind.

I pride myself on staying on top of things in the fitness and nutrition world – this vast, complicated, controversial world that is constantly changing. In the two decades or so I’ve spent learning about health and fitness, I’ve changed my stance on quite a few things.

Here are a few things I used to believe:

I used to believe…

Low carb diets were dangerous. There was this crazy rumour a decade or so ago that the extra protein you get in low carb diets could be harmful to the kidneys. This seems to have started from a study in patients with kidney disease where it was found that excess protein damaged their kidneys. For the rest of the (non-kidney diseased) population the effect did not occur.

Now I believe…

Low carb diets are perfectly safe and healthy. Most people in the general population can benefit from reducing their intake of carbs, particularly processed sugars and bread.

I used to believe…

Doing cardio daily was the way to optimal fitness.

Now I believe…

The benefits of weight training outweigh those of cardio training and if you have to chose between one and the other then weight training should come first.

I used to believe…

There was one ideal diet for everyone. At one point it was the government guidelines (these have changed in recent years to allow more variation in macro intakes) that were taught to me at University. Then I started to feel that low carb was the right way for everyone.

Now I believe…

There is no one optimal diet for everyone. The success of various diets is dependent on genetics, cultural background, gender, age, health status, and preference. Some people do well with a lot of protein and others less so. Some people can do well on dairy and grains while others won’t.

I used to believe…

Giving someone a good workout was what being a good personal trainer was all about.

Now I believe…

Practically anyone can give someone “a good workout”. Or what feels like a good workout. Just getting someone to break a sweat isn’t the sign of a good trainer. Anyone can say “Do 10 burpees. Do 10 pushups. Do 10 burpees!” and the client will feel like they had a workout.

But what’s the purpose of the program?

Has the client been assessed for strengths, weaknesses, or muscular imbalances?

Is the program progressive?

There’s a lot more to a great trainer than how hard she/he gets you to work out.

What have I learned? 

No doubt when I write a similar blog in five or ten years there will be a lot of things that I will have changed my mind about. New research will be done, I will come into contact with different concepts from new people I meet, and trends and general beliefs will change. I look forward to the possibilities.

Ivana Chapman 

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Ivana Chapman

Ivana Chapman

Ivana Chapman BSc BA CSCS is a Canadian fitness and nutrition coach, happy wife, and mom to an energetic 6-year-old boy. She is a writer, published fitness model, speaker, 3rd Dan black belt in Shotokan Karate, former World Cup Karate Champion, one-time marathoner, and CBBF National level Natural Bikini competitor. She loves weight training and chocolate, not always in that order of preference.
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